Enterprise SSDs: The Case for All-Flash Data Centers – EnterpriseStorageForum.com

An IT industry analyst article published by Enterprise Storage Forum.


article_enterprise-ssds-the-case-for-all-flash-data-centers
A new study found that some enterprises are experiencing significant benefits by converting their entire data centers to all-flash arrays.

by Mike Matchett, Sr. Analyst

Adding small amounts of flash as cache or dedicated storage is certainly a good way to accelerate a key application or two, but enterprises are increasingly adopting shared all-flash arrays to increase performance for every primary workload in the data center.

Flash is now competitively priced. All-flash array operations are simpler than when managing mixed storage, and the performance acceleration across-the-board produces visible business impact.

However, recent Taneja Group field research on all-flash data center adoption shows that successfully replacing traditional primary storage architectures with all-flash in the enterprise data center boils down to ensuring two key things: flash-specific storage engineering and mature enterprise-class storage features.

When looking for the best storage performance return on investment (ROI), it simply doesn’t work to replace HDDs with SSDs in existing traditional legacy storage arrays. Even though older generation arrays can be made faster in spots by inserting large amounts of underlying flash storage, there will be too many newly exposed overall performance bottlenecks to make it a worthwhile investment. After all, consistent IO performance (latency, IOPs, bandwidth) for all workloads is what makes all-flash a winning data center solution. It’s clear that to leverage a flash storage investment, IT requires flash-engineered designs that support flash IO speeds and volumes.

Even if all-flash performance is more than sufficient for some datacenter workloads, the cost per effective GB in a new flash engineered array can now handily beat sticking flash SSDs into older arrays, as well as readily undercutting large HDD spindle count solutions. A big part of this cost calculation stems from built-in wire speed (i.e. inline) capacity optimization features like deduplication and compression found in almost all flash engineered solutions. We also see increasing flash densities continuing to come to market (e.g., HPE and Netapp have already announced 16TB SSDs) with prices inevitably driving downwards. These new generations of flash are really bending flash “capacity” cost curves for the better.
All-Flash Field Research Results

Recently we had the opportunity to interview all-flash adopting storage managers with a variety of datacenter workloads and business requirements. We found that it was well understood that flash offered better performance. Once an all-flash solution was chosen architecturally, other factors like cost, resiliency, migration path and ultimately storage efficiency tended to drive vendor comparisons and acquisition decision-making. Here are a few interesting highlights from our findings:

Simplification – The deployment of all-flash represented an opportunity to consolidate and simplify heterogenous storage infrastructure and operations, with major savings just from environment simplification (e.g. reduction in number of arrays/spindles).
Consistency – The consistent IO at scale offered from an all-flash solution deployed across all tier 1 workloads greatly reduced IT storage management activities. In addition…(read the complete as-published article there)

Flash storage market remains a tsunami

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchSolidStateStorage.


A few months ago, Taneja Group surveyed 694 enterprise IT folks (about half in management, half in architecture/operations) about their storage acceleration and performance needs, perceptions and plans. Of course, examining the role and future of flash storage was a big part of our analysis of the flash storage market.

One of the key questions we asked was if they each thought that all-flash arrays would be used for all tier 1 workloads in the enterprise data center by the end of 2017, less than two years out. We found that 18% agreed without qualification, while another 35% agreed but thought they might need more time to accommodate natural storage refresh cycles. Together, that’s a majority of 53% firmly in the all-flash future camp, while only 10% outright disagreed that all-flash was going to be the dominant future storage platform.

Of course “tier 1” can mean different things to different folks, but people generally agree that tier 1 is their primary application storage powering key business processes. We followed up with several vendors about their all-flash future footprint visions and, unsurprisingly, we found broader, more inclusive descriptions. In general, all-flash array vendors think that all tier 1 and tier 2 data center storage could be on all-flash, while vendors with wider portfolios — including traditional storage and hybrids — have naturally hedged their bets on the flash storage market to “let” the client obtain what they see as best fitting their needs.

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Violin Bares New Gen of All-Flash Teeth

(Excerpt from original post on the Taneja Group News Blog)

Recently I hosted a second all-flash vendor panel on our Taneja Group BrightTalk channel. Violin Memory and IBM squared off (and agreed on many points) on the current good use cases, applications, and futures of the high-performance end of the flash storage market, with Netapp providing some balanced commentary preparing for their upcoming all-flash solution (FlashRay). Violin’s perspective was that efficiently designed all-flash systems are starting to be so cost-competitive  they are taking over tier 1 AND tier 2 workloads in the datacenter, and by the way, a competitive data center has already completely transitioned to their all-flash storage.

…(read the full post)