Cloud-based environment: The new normal for IT shops

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchServerVirtualization.


article_Cloud-based-environment-The-new-normal-for-IT-shops
The sky is the limit as new cloud management tools and evolutions in storage help make hybrid and multicloud IT a viable option for organizations with on-prem data centers.

Mike Matchett
Small World Big Data

Doubts about a cloud-based environment being little more than a passing fancy are vanishing. Plenty of real enterprises are not only comfortable releasing key workloads to public clouds, but are finding that hybrid operations at scale offer significant economic, productivity and competitive advantages over traditional on-premises data centers.

In fact, many of the big announcements at VMworld 2017 highlighted how mainstream businesses are now building and consuming hybrid and multicloud IT.
NSX all around

VMware has accelerated its transition from hypervisor vendor to cloud-management tool provider. Its virtual networking product, NSX, is not only a big source of revenue for VMware, but it also underpins many newer offerings, such as AppDefense, VMware Cloud on AWS and Network Insight. Basically, NSX has become the glue, the ether that fills VMware’s multicloud management business.

By shifting the center of its universe from hypervisor to the network between and underneath everything, VMware can now provide command and control over infrastructure and applications running in data centers, clouds, mobile devices and even out to the brave new internet of things (IoT) edge.

More MaaS, please
VMware rolled out seven management as a service (MaaS) offerings. MaaS describes a sales model in which a vendor delivers systems management functionality as a remote, subscription utility service. MaaS is ideal for systems management tasks across multiple clouds and complex hybrid infrastructures.

One of the motivations for MaaS is that the IT administrator doesn’t need to install or maintain on-premises IT management tools. Another is that the MaaS vendor gains an opportunity to mine big data aggregated across their entire customer pool, which should enable it to build deeply intelligent services.

Four of these new services are based on existing vRealize Operations technologies that VMware has repackaged for SaaS-style delivery. We’ve also heard that there are more MaaS products on the way.

It’s important for vendors to offer MaaS services — such as call home and remote monitoring — as the inevitable future consumption model for all systems management. There isn’t a single organization that benefits from employing an expert to maintain its internal, complex systems management tool. And with mobile, distributed and hybrid operations, most existing on-premises management products fall short of covering the whole enterprise IT architecture. I have no doubt the future is MaaS, a model that is bound to quickly attract IT shops that want to focus less on maintaining management tools and more on efficiently operating hybrid, multicloud architectures.

Storage evolves
The VMworld show floor has been a real storage showcase in recent years, with vendors fighting for more attention and setting up bigger, flashier booths. But it seemed this year that the mainline storage vendors pulled back a bit. This could be because software-defined storage products such as VMware vSAN are growing so fast or that the not-so-subtle presence of Dell EMC storage has discouraged others from pushing as hard at this show. Or it could be that in this virtual hypervisor market, hyper-convergence (and open convergence too) is where it’s at these days.

If cloud-based environments and hybrid management are finally becoming just part of normal IT operations, then what’s the next big thing?

Maybe it’s that all the past storage hoopla stemmed from flash storage crashing its way through the market. Competition on the flash angle is smoothing out now that everyone has flash-focused storage products. This year, nonvolatile memory express, or NVMe, was on everyone’s roadmap, but there was very little NVMe out there ready to roll. I’d look to next year as the big year for NVMe vendor positioning. Who will get it first? Who will be fastest? Who will be most cost-efficient? While there is some argument that NVMe isn’t going to disrupt the storage market as flash did, I expect similar first-to-market vendor competitions.

Data protection, on the other hand, seems to be gaining. Cohesity and other relatively new vendors have lots to offer organizations with a large virtual and cloud-based environment. While secondary storage hasn’t always seemed sexy, scalable and performant secondary storage can make all the difference in how well the whole enterprise IT effort works. Newer scale-out designs can keep masses of secondary data online and easily available for recall or archive, restore, analytics and testing. Every day, we hear of new machine learning efforts to use bigger and deeper data histories.

These storage directions — hyper-convergence, faster media and scale-out secondary storage — all support a more distributed and hybrid approach to data center architectures…(read the complete as-published article there)

What’s a Multi-cloud Really?  Some Insider Notes from VMworld 2017

(Excerpt from original post on the Taneja Group News Blog)

As comfortable 65-70 degree weather blankets New England here as we near end of summer, flying into Las Vegas for VMworld at 110 degrees seemed like dropping into hell. Last time I was in that kind of heat I was stepping off a C-130 into the Desert Shield/Desert Storm theater of operations. At least here, as everyone still able to breathe immediately says -“at least it’s a dry heat.”

…(read the full post)

Five VM-Level Infrastructure Adaptations — Virtualization Review

An IT industry analyst article published by Virtualization Review.

Infrastructure is evolving for the better, making the job of the admin easier in the long run. Here are five ways it’s evolving to work at the VM level.

article_adaptations-of-the-infrastructureIt used to be that IT struggled to intimately understand every app in order to provide the right supporting infrastructure. Today, server virtualization makes the job much easier, because IT can now just cater to VMs. By working and communicating at the VM level, both app owners and infrastructure admins stay focused, using a common API to help ensure apps are hosted effectively and IT runs efficiently.

But the virtual admin still has to translate what each VM requires, going beyond direct-server resources into the specialized domains of other IT infrastructure silos. While silos have traditionally pooled rare expertise to optimize expensive resources, in today’s virtualized world, silos seem to offer more friction than leverage. Here are five ways infrastructure is evolving to work at the VM level.

  1. TAKE 1
    VM-Centric Storage.

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Virtualizing Hadoop Impacts Big Data Storage

An IT industry analyst article published by Enterprise Storage Forum.

by Mike Matchett, Sr. Analyst, Taneja Group
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Hadoop is soon coming to enterprise IT in a big way. VMware’s new vSphere Big Data Extensions (BDE) commercializes its open source Project Serengeti to make it dead easy for enterprise admins to spin and up down virtual Hadoop clusters at will.

Now that VMware has made it clear that Hadoop is going to be fully supported as a virtualized workload in enterprise vSphere environments, here at Taneja Group we expect a rapid pickup in Hadoop adoption across organizations of all sizes.

However, Hadoop is all about mapping parallel compute jobs intelligently over massive amounts of distributed data. Cluster deployment and operation are becoming very easy for the virtual admin. But in a virtual environment where storage can be effectively abstracted from compute clients, there are some important complexities and opportunities to consider when designing the underlying storage architecture. Some specific concerns with running Hadoop in a virtual environment include considering how to configure virtual data nodes, how to best utilize local hypervisor server DAS, and when to think about leveraging external SAN/NAS.

The main idea behind virtualizing Hadoop is to take advantage of deploying Hadoop scale-out nodes as virtual machines instead of as racked commodity physical servers. Clusters can be provisioned on-demand and elastically expanded or shrunk. Multiple Hadoop virtual nodes can be hosted on each hypervisor physical server, and as virtual machines can be easily allocated more or less resource for a given application. Hypervisor level HA/FT capabilities can be brought to bear on production Hadoop apps. VMware’s BDE even includes QoS algorithms that help prioritize clusters dynamically, shrinking lower-priority cluster sizes as necessary to ensure high-priority cluster service.

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Don’t Miss These VMworld 2013 Sessions

An IT industry analyst article published by Virtualization Review.

With 358 sessions, time is money. Here are five sessions where your time will be well spent.

article_dont-miss-these-vmworld-2013-sessionsTAKE 1 Directions in VMware EUC & the Multi-Device, Virtual Workspace (EUC4544)

Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) and related end-user computing capabilities are most definitely not dead. In fact, I think the technologies are finally starting to support practical and cost-effective implementations for every size business. VMware Horizon and Mirage likely have some hot things going, and it’s always interesting to see how PCoIP has evolved.

TAKE 2 Designing Your Next-Generation Datacenter for Network Virtualization (NET5184)

Can you spell VXLAN? If you come away from VMworld 2013 with a good understanding of software-defined networking (SDN) and network virtualization, you could be the geek hero of your IT shop.

…(read the complete as-published article there)