What’s the future of data storage in 2016?

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchStorage.


It’s hard to make stunning predictions on the future of data storage that are certain to come true, but it’s that time of year and I’m going to step out on that limb again. I’ll review my predictions from last year as I go — after all, how much can you trust me if I’m not on target year after year? (Yikes!)

Last year, I said the total data storage market would stay flat despite big growth in unstructured data. I’d have to say that seems to be true, if not actually dropping. Despite lots of new entrants in the market, the average vendor margin in storage is narrowing with software-defined variants showing up everywhere, open-source alternatives nibbling at the edges, commodity-based appliances becoming the rule, and ever-cheaper “usable” flash products improving performance and density at the same time.

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Flash storage market remains a tsunami

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchSolidStateStorage.


A few months ago, Taneja Group surveyed 694 enterprise IT folks (about half in management, half in architecture/operations) about their storage acceleration and performance needs, perceptions and plans. Of course, examining the role and future of flash storage was a big part of our analysis of the flash storage market.

One of the key questions we asked was if they each thought that all-flash arrays would be used for all tier 1 workloads in the enterprise data center by the end of 2017, less than two years out. We found that 18% agreed without qualification, while another 35% agreed but thought they might need more time to accommodate natural storage refresh cycles. Together, that’s a majority of 53% firmly in the all-flash future camp, while only 10% outright disagreed that all-flash was going to be the dominant future storage platform.

Of course “tier 1” can mean different things to different folks, but people generally agree that tier 1 is their primary application storage powering key business processes. We followed up with several vendors about their all-flash future footprint visions and, unsurprisingly, we found broader, more inclusive descriptions. In general, all-flash array vendors think that all tier 1 and tier 2 data center storage could be on all-flash, while vendors with wider portfolios — including traditional storage and hybrids — have naturally hedged their bets on the flash storage market to “let” the client obtain what they see as best fitting their needs.

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Big data analytics applications impact storage systems

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchStorage.


Whether driven by direct competition or internal business pressure, CIOs, CDOs and even CEOs today are looking to squeeze more value, more insight and more intelligence out of their data. They no longer can afford to archive, ignore or throw away data if it can be turned into a valuable asset. At face value, it might seem like a no-brainer — “we just need to analyze all that data to mine its value.” But, as you know, keeping any data, much less big data, has a definite cost. Processing larger amounts of data at scale is challenging, and hosting all that data on primary storage hasn’t always been feasible.

Historically, unless data had some corporate value — possibly as a history trail for compliance, a source of strategic insight or intelligence that can optimize operational processes — it was tough to justify keeping it. Today, thanks in large part to big data analytics applications, that thinking is changing. All of that bulky low-level bigger data has little immediate value, but there might be great future potential someday, so you want to keep it — once it’s gone, you lose any downstream opportunity.

To extract value from all that data, however, IT must not only store increasingly large volumes of data, but also architect systems that can process and analyze it in multiple ways.

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Navigate data lakes to manage big data

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchStorage.


Big data sure is exciting to business folks, with all sorts of killer applications just waiting to be discovered. And you no doubt have a growing pile of data bursting the seams of your current storage infrastructure, with lots of requests to mine even more voluminous data streams. Haven’t you been collecting microsecond end-user behavior across all your customers and prospects, not to mention collating the petabytes of data exhaust from instrumenting your systems to the nth degree? Imagine the insight management would have if they could look at all that data at once. Forget about data governance, data management, data protection and all those other IT worries — you just need to land all that data in a relatively scale-cheap Hadoop cluster!

Seriously, though, big data lakes can meet growing data challenges and provide valuable new services to your business. By collecting a wide variety of data sets relevant to the business all in one place and enabling multi-talented analytics based on big data approaches that easily scale, many new data mining opportunities can be created. The total potential value of a data lake grows with the amount of useful data it holds available for analysis. And, one of the key tenets of big data and the big data lake concept is that you don’t have to create a master schema ahead of time, so non-linear growth is possible.

The enterprise data lakes or hub concept was first proposed by big data vendors like Cloudera and Hortonworks, ostensibly using vanilla scale-out HDFS-based commodity storage. But it just so happens that the more data you keep on hand, the more storage of all kinds you will need. Eventually, all corporate data is likely to be considered big data. However, not all of that corporate data is best hosted on a commodity scale-out HDFS cluster.

So, today, traditional storage vendors are signing up to the big data lakes vision. From a storage marketing perspective, it seems like data lakes are the new cloud. “Everyone needs a data lake. How can you compete without one (or two or three)?” And there are a variety of enterprise storage options for big data, including enterprise storage, that can provide remote storage that acts like HDFS, Hadoop virtualization that can translate other storage protocols into HDFS, and scalable software-defined storage options.

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Moving to all-flash? Think about your data storage infrastructure

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchStorage.


Everyone is now onboard with flash. All the key storage vendors have at least announced entry into the all-flash storage array market, with most having offered hybrids — solid-state drive-pumped traditional arrays — for years. As silicon storage gets cheaper and denser, it seems inevitable that data centers will migrate from spinning disks to “faster, better and cheaper” options, with non-volatile memory poised to be the long-term winner.

But the storage skirmish today seems to be heading toward the total cost of ownership end of things, where two key questions must be answered:

  • How much performance is needed, and how many workloads in the data center have data with varying quality of service (QoS) requirements or data that ages out?
  • Are hybrid arrays a better choice to handle mixed workloads through advanced QoS and auto-tiering features?

All-flash proponents argue that cost and capacity will continue to drop for flash compared to hard disk drives (HDDs), and that no workload is left wanting with the ability of all-flash to service all I/Os at top performance. Yet we see a new category of hybrids on the market that are designed for flash-level performance and then fold in multiple tiers of colder storage. The argument there is that data isn’t all the same and its value changes over its lifetime. Why store older, un-accessed data on a top tier when there are cheaper, capacity-oriented tiers available?

It’s misleading to lump together hybrids that are traditional arrays with solid-state drives (SSDs) added and the new hybrids that might be one step evolved past all-flash arrays. And it can get even more confusing when the old arrays get stuffed with nothing but flash and are positioned as all-flash products. To differentiate, some industry wags like to use the term “flash-first” to describe newer-generation products purpose-built for flash speeds. That still could cause some confusion when considering both hybrids and all-flash designs. It may be more accurate to call the flash-first hybrids “flash-converged.” By being flash-converged, you can expect to buy one of these new hybrids with nothing but flash inside and get all-flash performance.

We aren’t totally convinced that the future data center will have just a two-tier system with flash on top backed by tape (or a remote cold cloud), but a “hot-cold storage” future is entirely possible as intermediate tiers of storage get, well, dis-intermediated. We’ve all predicted the demise of 15K HDDs for a while; can all the other HDDs be far behind as QoS controls get more sophisticated in handling the automatic mixing of hot and cold to create any temperature storage you might need? …

…(read the complete as-published article there)