Cloud-based environment: The new normal for IT shops

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchServerVirtualization.


article_Cloud-based-environment-The-new-normal-for-IT-shops
The sky is the limit as new cloud management tools and evolutions in storage help make hybrid and multicloud IT a viable option for organizations with on-prem data centers.

Mike Matchett
Small World Big Data

Doubts about a cloud-based environment being little more than a passing fancy are vanishing. Plenty of real enterprises are not only comfortable releasing key workloads to public clouds, but are finding that hybrid operations at scale offer significant economic, productivity and competitive advantages over traditional on-premises data centers.

In fact, many of the big announcements at VMworld 2017 highlighted how mainstream businesses are now building and consuming hybrid and multicloud IT.
NSX all around

VMware has accelerated its transition from hypervisor vendor to cloud-management tool provider. Its virtual networking product, NSX, is not only a big source of revenue for VMware, but it also underpins many newer offerings, such as AppDefense, VMware Cloud on AWS and Network Insight. Basically, NSX has become the glue, the ether that fills VMware’s multicloud management business.

By shifting the center of its universe from hypervisor to the network between and underneath everything, VMware can now provide command and control over infrastructure and applications running in data centers, clouds, mobile devices and even out to the brave new internet of things (IoT) edge.

More MaaS, please
VMware rolled out seven management as a service (MaaS) offerings. MaaS describes a sales model in which a vendor delivers systems management functionality as a remote, subscription utility service. MaaS is ideal for systems management tasks across multiple clouds and complex hybrid infrastructures.

One of the motivations for MaaS is that the IT administrator doesn’t need to install or maintain on-premises IT management tools. Another is that the MaaS vendor gains an opportunity to mine big data aggregated across their entire customer pool, which should enable it to build deeply intelligent services.

Four of these new services are based on existing vRealize Operations technologies that VMware has repackaged for SaaS-style delivery. We’ve also heard that there are more MaaS products on the way.

It’s important for vendors to offer MaaS services — such as call home and remote monitoring — as the inevitable future consumption model for all systems management. There isn’t a single organization that benefits from employing an expert to maintain its internal, complex systems management tool. And with mobile, distributed and hybrid operations, most existing on-premises management products fall short of covering the whole enterprise IT architecture. I have no doubt the future is MaaS, a model that is bound to quickly attract IT shops that want to focus less on maintaining management tools and more on efficiently operating hybrid, multicloud architectures.

Storage evolves
The VMworld show floor has been a real storage showcase in recent years, with vendors fighting for more attention and setting up bigger, flashier booths. But it seemed this year that the mainline storage vendors pulled back a bit. This could be because software-defined storage products such as VMware vSAN are growing so fast or that the not-so-subtle presence of Dell EMC storage has discouraged others from pushing as hard at this show. Or it could be that in this virtual hypervisor market, hyper-convergence (and open convergence too) is where it’s at these days.

If cloud-based environments and hybrid management are finally becoming just part of normal IT operations, then what’s the next big thing?

Maybe it’s that all the past storage hoopla stemmed from flash storage crashing its way through the market. Competition on the flash angle is smoothing out now that everyone has flash-focused storage products. This year, nonvolatile memory express, or NVMe, was on everyone’s roadmap, but there was very little NVMe out there ready to roll. I’d look to next year as the big year for NVMe vendor positioning. Who will get it first? Who will be fastest? Who will be most cost-efficient? While there is some argument that NVMe isn’t going to disrupt the storage market as flash did, I expect similar first-to-market vendor competitions.

Data protection, on the other hand, seems to be gaining. Cohesity and other relatively new vendors have lots to offer organizations with a large virtual and cloud-based environment. While secondary storage hasn’t always seemed sexy, scalable and performant secondary storage can make all the difference in how well the whole enterprise IT effort works. Newer scale-out designs can keep masses of secondary data online and easily available for recall or archive, restore, analytics and testing. Every day, we hear of new machine learning efforts to use bigger and deeper data histories.

These storage directions — hyper-convergence, faster media and scale-out secondary storage — all support a more distributed and hybrid approach to data center architectures…(read the complete as-published article there)

Will container virtualization be the biggest data center trend of 2016?

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchServerVirtualization.


It’s hard to predict what the biggest thing to hit the data center will be in 2016. Big data? Hyper-convergence? Hybrid cloud? I’ve decided that this is the year that containers will arrive in a big way — much earlier and faster than many expect, catching unprepared IT shops by surprise.

Unlike other technologies like big data that require vision and forward investment, containers are a natural next step for application packaging, deployment and hosting that don’t require massive shifts in mindset or vision. It’s just quicker and easier to develop and deploy an application in a container than it is to build a virtual appliance. Containerized architectures also have the compelling operational and financial benefits of cheaper or free licensing, more efficient use of physical resources, better scalability and ultimately service reliability. Looking ahead, container virtualization will help organizations take better advantage of hybrid or cross-cloud environments.

Server virtualization was also a great idea when it first came out with significant advantages over physical hosting, but it still took many years for it to mature (remember how long it was before anyone hosted an important database in a VM?). The same has been true for private or hybrid clouds, new storage technologies and even big data. But even though container virtualization  is just out of the gate, it has gotten farther down the maturity road by leveraging the roadmap laid out by server virtualization. And you can get a jumpstart by using trusted hypervisors like VMware vSphere Integrated Containers to shepherd in containers while the native container world polishes up its rougher edges. Because containers are sleeker and slimmer than VMs (they are essentially just processes), they will slip into the data center even if IT isn’t looking or paying attention (and even if IT doesn’t want them yet).

…(read the complete as-published article there)

Container technology’s role in storage

An IT industry analyst article published by SearchServerVirtualization.


Could containers dethrone virtual machines as the next generation compute architecture? I’ve heard many industry folks say that containers are moving faster into real deployments than almost any previous technology, driven by application developers, DevOps and business-side folks looking for agility as much as IT needs efficiency and scale.

Containers were one of the hottest topics at VMworld 2015. VMware clearly sees a near-term mash-up of virtual machines and containers coming quickly to corporate data centers. And IT organizations still need to uphold security and data management requirements — even with containerized applications. VMware has done a bang-up job of delivering that on the VM side, and now it’s weighed in with designs that extend its virtualization and cloud management solutions to support (and, we think, ultimately assimilate) enterprise containerization projects.

VMware’s new vSphere Integrated Containers (VICs) make managing and securing containers, which in this case are running nested in virtual machines (called “virtual container hosts”), pretty much the same as managing and securing traditional VMs. The VICs show up in VMware management tools as first-class IT managed objects equivalent to VMs, and inherit much of what of vSphere offers to virtual machine management, including robust security. This makes container adoption something every VMware customer can simply slide into.

However, here at Taneja Group we think the real turning point for container adoption will be when containers move beyond being simply stateless compute engines and deal directly with persistent data.

…(read the complete as-published article there)